Back to School: Student Teaching

 

When I transferred to Western Washington University in 2011 it felt like this moment was ages away and now, two years later, I’m here!  I’m one week in to my year long internship and the learning has only just begun.  I’ve spent the past five days working with my cooperating teacher to set up the classroom for students to come back on Tuesday, attending staff meetings, and even participated in an intro video for our sister school in China!  I got my first classroom filing cabinet, my first school district e-mail address, and had my first parent meet and greet.  It has been an exciting week to say the least.

homeroom-login-logo

Overall the experience has been amazing.  One big area of concern for me has been how to manage and organize all of the information and data I have for my students and be able to quickly access it.  How many post-it notes crammed in a folder is too many?  At a staff meeting this week, I learned about a great piece of technology my school district has just started using for teachers to access student data called Homeroom.  

The site imports your class roster and gives you access to test scores for all of your students for as far back as the district has data.  You can include or exclude certain students or groups — for example, you can single out only the students who were scored not yet at standard for last year’s reading test to look at who might need extra support during literacy block.  Or you could look for students who scored remarkably high to see who you might want to plan extension activities for.  

assessments

 

Screenshot found here

You can look at one assessment at a time or group them — maybe you want MSP and MAPS math testing data or maybe you only want their BAS reading scores without the MSP data.  You can also get more specific information about an individual student: past schools, parents’ names, notes from administrators, test data over time, and so on.  This is such a great tool for teachers to have access to!  From what I heard, it sounds like what would have taken teachers hours on hours to compile is now at their fingertips instantly.

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